Friday, October 28, 2016

The Annual Sisters Pumpkin Challenge





For the past couple of years or so my Sister and I've had a friendly little Fall challenge.  Our Dad used to haul freight and came home once with a case or two of Libby's pumpkin puree.  Of course, these were not the cute little cans from the grocery store but #10 cans full!


It's a little tricky using up all that orange goo once you open the can, but my sister and I decided to have fun with it all and our Annual Pumpkin Challenge began - Completely unofficial though right? The Challenge ends when the puree is gone, or before it spoils.
Here are some pics and recipes if you'd like to see what we've been making.


Easiest Ever Pumpkin Muffins - From My Sister




This pumpkin cookie/muffin recipe is ridiculously easy and a great way to start baking with pumpkin puree. Despite all common sense, this recipe doesn't need any eggs. This recipe is our go-to when we want a quick fall baking fix.


Ingredients:
1 box spice cake mix
1 15 oz can pumpkin puree
1 bag of chocolate or cinnamon chips
Mix and drop by spoonfuls onto a cookie sheet or into muffin papers in muffin tin. Bake about 17-18 minutes @ 350*

Pumpkin Chicken-Noodle Soup






Ingredients:
Mire-Poix (1 cup each of diced onion, carrot, and celery)
One diced leek
salt to taste
1 bag of egg noodles of choice
1 box or container of chicken broth
3 chopped cooked chicken breasts
1/4 to 1/2 pound of chopped cooked sausage
1 to 2 cups pumpkin puree
dash of pumpkin pie spice or more to taste
Heavy cream or evaporated milk


In a large pot, sautee vegetebles with some salt until soft.  Add broth and water as needed.  After the soup comes to a boil, add noodles and cook until soft.  Add meat, pumpkin, and puree.  Add about a cup or more of heavy cream or evaporated milk.


Pumpkin Pancakes - From my Sister

Sometimes in our haste to use up the stuff we just throw pumpkin puree into what we already have going.  Like about a half a cup into these yummy pancakes.

You Had me at Hello Fall Cookies





Don't be tempted here to add more pumpkin.  To get the right texture, this cookie recipe can only take so much on the wet stuff.  You'll taste it though, I promise.


Ingredients:
1 pound (4 sticks) of butter
2 cups brown sugar
1 1/2 cup white sugar
3 eggs
1 1/2 tsp salt
1 1/2 tsp soda
1/2 tsp pumpkin pie spice
1 1/2 Tbsp vanilla
1 scant cup pumpkin puree (sometimes less but never more)
2 drops red food coloring
2 drops yellow food coloring
7 cups flour
1 bag white chocolate chips


Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Melt butter.  In the bowl of a mixer, measure out sugars, add butter and mix.  Add other ingredients, except flour and chips and mix.  Add flour and chips and mix.  Using a scooper, measure out scoops onto a cookie sheet, lightly sprayed or onto parchment.  Bake 10 to 12 minutes, or until just barely done.  Makes between four and five dozen for me.  These look and have the texture of the Pepperidge farm ones, but taste so much better!


Part Two!

After a few days my sister socked-it-to-me, with:


Our Favorite Pumpkin-Cinnamon Rolls

This one has been a favorite of both my sister and I for a few years.  She adds 1/2 cup of mashed potatoes to her dough.  Here's the recipe



So, I decided to have myself a Friday night Cook-a-thon, and pumped out the following:




Spicy Pumpkin Warm-up Drink



 
We sub out some of the heavy cream for evaporated milk. 

Crockpot Pumpkin French Toast Casserole



I used this recipe and added in quite a bit of pumpkin to the egg mixture.

Downeast Maine Pumpkin Bread



This one has been our family favorite for about 5 years. Seriously, it's so good.  I got the recipe here.




This got me, almost, to the bottom of my can!!
Then my sister had to up her game, and came back at me with:


Pumpkin Fettucine



Pumpkin Raviolli

(She always gets me with the homemade pasta)



with Pumpkin Filling




and Gorgonzola Sauce



and then she used the filling to make:


Pumpkin Pizza!



She used the filling for the ravioli as the base, and topped the pizza with sautéed onions,  fresh mozzarella and sage leaves. That finished up her can, making the men at her house grateful to finally have a break from all the orange. 

Not to be outdone just yet, I finished, yes finished,  off my can by making:


Sausage-Pumpkin Soup (NOT to be pictured here)



This was a very great mistake, according to all who eat here at my house, so I won't post the recipe here.  I did end my canned experience on a more positive note, with what ended up being our favorite thing to make, and eat:


Pumpkin Cookie Butter!



We bought a jar of this stuff at Trader Joe's on a whim (isn't that how it always starts?), and it became our favorite thing recently for sandwiches and whatever else.  I came across this recipe online, and when I saw how easy it was to make (three ingredients, seriously) I decided to give it a whirl.  The only change I made to the recipe was to substitute 1/2 cup pumpkin puree for the 1/4 cup water. (In the future I will try coconut oil instead of vegetable) We used ginger snaps for the cookies, for a nice dark spread for toast and weekday sandwiches.  Oh yeah, and dip some apple slices into it! This stuff is seriously addicting.


My house is now a mess, but at least it smells really good here, and it was a whole lot of fun.



This competition is now finished, and I found a good use for my can. Happy Fall!




Saturday, October 8, 2016

There was always another baby.....





 




In 2005


I have tasked myself most-recently, in the wake of my oldest child's eighteenth birthday, of going through and organizing all our family photos.


The birthday parties.
The goofy moments.
The toothless faces.
And while looking through everything, I am seeing something in a different way.


There was always another baby.


I remember scrambling to pull off a summer zoo trip with the kids, my bump in the way, always in the way, and then baby pics to follow. The bump in the pictures doesn't always tell the real story - of morning sickness, of exhausted days, of illness, of waiting.
There was the kitchen remodel.  Garage racks full of our dishes and pots in the living room, kids playing around everywhere, and there, another newborn baby in the middle of the mess.
I went through a lot of pictures last week to find some for my husband's cousin, who was visiting.  He remarked that every time he came back to see us; 


There was another baby.


It hit me.  It's true.  I had never thought about it in quite that way.  We got pretty good over the years of making room for another little one, in some ways, even being pretty cavalier about it: by the time our last little one, #6 came, I was unworried about just about everything - where to put the baby, what they baby really needed, what the latest gadgets were (who cares?) etc. 


But, looking through all those pictures, I know that even in the middle of the tough stuff, I loved every single minute of it all.  Every baby smile, every first step, those little words, those first teeth, those school field trips.


Then later on the music concerts, the soccer games, the summer car trips.
Now it's the driving lessons, the dating scene for my older kids, marching band, and watching them become these amazing people: with the best and worst of you somewhere inside of them. 


There is so much craziness.  The full calendar, the occasional fights, the clothes that they will outgrow in a just month or two, the fridge that empties itself magically every couple of days. 
Sometimes during the stress of all this teenager stuff, I dry my tears while snuggled-up to my two-year-old, and remind myself how fast it all goes by.


Thank goodness, there's still another baby. 


I'm so grateful for this extraordinary, jumbo-size family and larger-than-life experience.  But after writing this, I suddenly feel like I need a very long nap.








Happy 18 Naomi. Every day with you was a cherished privilege, and I can't wait to see what you'll do and where you'll go.  And as you break my heart by growing up and moving on, thank goodness:


There's still another baby. 



Saturday, June 18, 2016

Roses and Remembering

Bolero
 
Eglantyne
 
Penstemon
Wild Foxlove
 
These lovely photos are the result of everything else pretty much falling apart. 
It's been a month. Water heater problems, coughs and colds, dog sprayed by a skunk, landed myself in the ER (much better now), meetings, birthdays, races, crazy. One kid nearly set our house on fire right before everybody came over for BBQ. It goes on. This week, I sat for a moment, silently praying to thank God for how wonderful it all truly is. Because even with the crazy it truly is. With the dynamic of our family shifting to the teenage years, it had been a few years since we'd all trekked ourselves over to Chuck E Cheese for a birthday. This month, we went to celebrate my daughter's sixth birthday. I can remember so many times going to Chuck E Cheese with my little kids that are now big teenagers.  We all got to take a step back and remember how short a good childhood is.


We also managed to make a visit to the Granpa's grave.  We still miss him, and we try to keep the memories alive for our kids as long as we can.


And then there's the roses.  Between all the mishaps, injuries, and illnesses; the quiet knitting needles, and the masses of unfinished laundry, I have squished in some time for one of my passions:  Old Roses.  I keep reading books about old lost heirloom roses, found in old cemeteries, or old forgotten European gardens, or along old homesteads or cabins. They read like detective novels.  Then of course, as I drive the kids to school, to scouts, to everything, I've been taking old country roads, and making discoveries of my own. I've been finding wild roses, and antiques, planted long ago, along dusty old roads, and in some private local gardens. Their names haunt me:   Ispahan, Belle Isis, Souvenir de la Malmaison, Queen of Denmark, Celestial, Great Maiden's Blush, Autumn Damask.  They are all fragrant in a way that no modern rose is - the smell is intoxicating!  In my own rose beds, I'm planting the newer David Austin English varieties that are bred to look old.  There's almost nothing that the smell and sight of a rose can't cure, at least for me. 


Long ago, roses were often cultivated for their healing properties, and they were always included in the old monastery gardens for that purpose.  This month, they've healed me.  And oh, how I've needed those roses this month!

Gertrude Jekyll and Abraham Darby

Munstead Wood



Wild Mutiflora Rose

 
?
 

 

Mystery rose from some private gardens

Mystery old rose found on the side of a road


Flower heads left after taking old rose cuttings